The Rules of Freedom: The place of street music in the life of our cities – Jonny Walker

Today’s guest post by Jonny Walker – singer, songwriter and founder of the Association of Street Performers – comes in the face of recent moves against buskers by Camden council, which is considering draconian restrictions and fines. In advance of the council decision next week, Jonny outlines the ramifications of these proposals and the relationship of street music to city life.  

Right On: Live Music, Noise and Rights – Adam Behr

Following last week’s post about what makes for a healthy ‘musical city’ Adam Behr looks at the concepts that underpin the legislative agenda on live music, and the issues that surround the difference between music and noise.  

Music Licensing and Sustainable Nightlife: Germany’s “GEMA- Tarifreform” Debates – Luis-Manuel Garcia

Our latest guest post is by Luis-Manuel Garcia, of the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin. It provides a brief overview of the author’s in-depth article for Resident Advisor. Here he explains the background to the dispute that has erupted regarding the German royalty collection society’s proposed tariff reforms and their potential effect on the nightclub scene.  

Big news for small venues in South Australia – John Wardle

John Wardle is one of Australia’s foremost advocates for live music. A musician and teacher, his research and campaigning work has led to involvement in music policy at both state and federal level. As a leader in the Raise the Bar campaign, he was instrumental in the removal of New South Wales’ Place of Public Entertainment Licenses in 2009, which has freed up the provision of live music there. He was also a source of advice for the UK Live Music Forum’s campaign for exemption for small gigs, which culminated in this year’s Live Music Act. His latest success comes with the introduction of the Small Venue License in South Australia, which does away with the ‘needs test’ and a separate process for an entertainment license. Here, he discusses this new development and explains what work there is still be done.  

Flyering is a vital part of grassroots live music promotion – Dr Emma Webster

Following on from Lord Clement-Jones’ blog post about the Campaign Against Leafleting Bans, Dr Emma Webster’s reply is based on her personal experiences as a flyerer, and on her doctoral research into the promotion of live music. In this post, she identifies a number of reasons why flyering is a vital part of grassroots live music promotion, including branding, networks, and cost.  

Campaign Against Leafleting Bans – Lord Clement-Jones

Lord Clement-Jones, one of the driving forces behind the Live Music Act 2012, is now involved in a campaign to protect small-scale cultural and community events from local authority restrictions on flyering. In this blog post, he explains why he believes that leafleting is a key civic freedom and one vital to grassroots events.  

The role of street music for the ‘creative city’ – Karolina Doughty

In an introduction to new joint research taking place at the Universities of Brighton and Stockholm, Karolina Doughty looks beneath the surface of busking and street music to provide an account of the different cultural and policy debates surround the practice and how they fit into the ‘affective management’ of modern cities.